Support our people

Help build a generation of outstanding researchers
Two researchers in white lab coats getting samples out of a supercooled container.

Intro

New ideas and perspectives are the key to driving scientific progress.

At the Crick, we support the development of talented researchers who are asking the questions that will shape the future of biomedicine – enabling them to do their boldest, most ambitious and creative work.

We are home to over 1,500 researchers across more than 100 laboratories.

Support the brightest minds who are working at the frontier of discovery to treat, diagnose and prevent human disease.  

Fund our people

Help support Crick researchers as they tackle the biggest questions in biomedical science.

Incubating talent

Naomi Moris’s London secondary school did not particularly push its students towards university, let alone to pursue a career as a scientist.

Motivated by a subject that she admits still fills her with a sense of awe and wonder, she forged ahead.

When deciding where to establish herself as an independent researcher investigating human development Naomi was impressed by what the Crick had to offer.

It was the unmatched ability to set up a team with core funding and direct access to state-of-the-art equipment that drew her here.   
 

A developing gastruloid.

Naomi Moris

The funding programme for early-career researchers is an incubator for our research.

We can be bold and set about addressing difficult questions because we’ve got the support and resources. It gives you the opportunity to get a foothold in your area of research and make significant contributions to your field.

We can be broader, quicker, and look more deeply at the at the way embryos mature – and that will have an impact on areas from infertility to developmental disorders.

Naomi Moris

Group Leader, Developmental Models Lab

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Supporting future leaders

As a young girl, Foteini Papaleonidopoulou stood on the world stage and blew out the Olympic flame at the 2004 closing ceremony in Athens.

Even then she knew that she wanted a career in science and aspired to make a contribution to our understanding of cancer. She is now a PhD student investigating genes that are often linked to tumour development.

As a committee member of the Young Embryologists Network, she is highly driven to advance her academic career, supported by the world-class facilities at the Crick.

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Support our science

You can contribute to our science by giving to a broad range of gift opportunities or by donating to our Horizon fund - supporting all the work we do at the Crick, now and in the future.

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