Story

Antonio Rullan

Antonio Rullan, 2017 intake Crick doctoral clinical fellow, Erik Sahai's lab, now clinical research fellow and medical oncologist at the Royal Marsden Hospital/ICR and visiting scientist at the Crick.

I have always had a "crush" on science. During my undergraduate, I was involved with a cancer research project and enjoyed it so much that I thought about going into a PhD just after finishing medical school. However, I decided to start with my clinical training.

Before coming to the Crick, I worked for five years as a medical Oncology trainee in Barcelona. After finishing my specialty training, I decided that I wanted to do a PhD.

The Crick offered a fantastic opportunity with a well-defined programme and the opportunity to develop a translational project between a lab at the Crick and a clinical department at the ICR/Royal Marsden.

The environment at the Crick is amazing, and you can feel that the people working here are passionate about what they do. This enthusiasm is contagious and helps to do your best.

Starting to work in the lab full-time is not easy, but everybody has been very helpful, and it is both challenging and rewarding to hypothesise, design an experiment and do it.

The environment at the Crick is amazing, and you can feel that the people working here are passionate about what they do. This enthusiasm is contagious and helps to do your best.

After finishing my PhD, I would like to look for a position in which I can be involved in starting and developing translational research, from either a clinical or a more lab-based point of view.

Update, Spring 2023:

Since completing my PhD I have continued to develop my aspiration to become a clinician scientist. I hold a visiting scientist position at the Francis Crick to finish up and publish some of the projects I started during my PhD. My current position is at the Royal Marsden and the ICR, where I combine lab work as a postdoc with clinical work in the Head and Neck research team looking after patients in clinical trials.