Academy of Medical Sciences welcomes new Crick Fellows

Caroline Hill and James Briscoe

Crick group leaders Caroline Hill and James Briscoe have been elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences in recognition of their outstanding work advancing medical science.

The Academy of Medical Sciences is an independent body representing UK medical science, which aims to advance biomedical and health research to benefit society. Every year, 46 Fellows are elected for their contributions to biomedical and health research.

Paul Nurse, Director of the Crick, said: "Caroline and James are superb developmental biologists who have made significant contributions to their field. Their election to the Academy is a testament to the value of fundamental discovery research for advancing medical science."

Caroline has been elected for her world-leading work on Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) signalling molecules, which tell cells when to grow and what to do at different times. They play a key role in early development as organisms grow from fertilised eggs into embryos, but faulty signalling can contribute to cancer and other diseases.

It brings me great pleasure to congratulate the new Fellows, each of whom has pushed the boundaries of their individual research field.
Robert Lechler, President of the Academy of Medical Sciences

“Election to the Academy of Medical Sciences is an enormous honour and distinction and I am absolutely thrilled," said Caroline. " I relish the opportunity to join this illustrious community of outstanding scientists. I have been very fortunate to work over the last 24 years with an extremely talented group of people, and this recognition is most certainly for them as much as it is for me.”

James Briscoe, who also became a Fellow of the Royal Society earlier in the year, was elected to the Academy for his work on how tissues are formed and patterned in embryos. His team discovered key genetic and molecular processes that precisely assemble the spinal cord in growing embryos, answering fundamental questions about early development.

"I am absolutely delighted to have been elected to the Academy of Medical Sciences," said James. "It’s an enormous honour. Science is a team effort and recognition such as this reflects the fantastic contributions of the members of my research group over the last two decades. As a developmental biologist I am particularly pleased that the Academy continues to value the importance of fundamental research in medical science."

Professor Sir Robert Lechler, President of the Academy of Medical Sciences, said: "It brings me great pleasure to congratulate the new Fellows, each of whom has pushed the boundaries of their individual research field. I am always delighted to see the Fellowship expand, adding fresh talent to our invaluable pool of high quality guidance, advice and expertise."

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