Charlie Swanton elected EMBO member

20 June 2017

Charlie Swanton

©  Francis Crick Institute

Last Friday, the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO) announced that Charlie Swanton, Group Leader at the Francis Crick Institute, has been elected to its membership for his contribution to the life sciences.

Charlie's research group is following cancer patients in a large-scale clinical study called TRACERx to investigate how cells in tumours change and adapt over time and in reaction to treatment. This has consequences for how best to characterise and treat a patient's cancer.

Becoming a member of EMBO gives scientists the opportunity to meet and collaborate with other molecular biologists in Europe. Charlie is one of 65 new members who will join a group of over 1700 of the best researchers in Europe and around the world.

"Election to the EMBO Membership is recognition of research excellence, and I am pleased to welcome so many great scientists to our organisation," says EMBO Director Maria Leptin.

New EMBO Members and Associate Members will be formally welcomed at the EMBO Members' Meeting in Heidelberg 18-20 October 2017.

The news of Charlie's EMBO membership comes just a few weeks after the announcement that he won the 2016 San Salvatore Foundation award for his contribution to scientific research that underlies new approaches to antitumour therapeutics.

"I am really delighted to have been appointed to EMBO membership amongst such fantastic scientists and to have been awarded the San Salvatore Prize," says Charlie. "None of this would have been possible without the endless support and hard work from my extraordinary colleagues and laboratory teams at the Crick, UCLH and UCL."

 

  • The European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO) has announced that Charlie Swanton, Group Leader at the Francis Crick Institute, has been elected to its membership for his contribution to the life sciences.
  • Charlie also recently won the San Salvatore Foundated award for his contribution to scientific research that underlies new approaches to antitumour therapeutics.