Moritz Treek

Moritz Treeck

Qualifications and history

  • 2009 PhD Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine Hamburg, University of Hamburg, Germany
  • 2009- 2013 Postdoctoral fellow, Stanford University, Stanford, USA
  • 2014 Group Leader, Medical Research Council National Institute for Medical Research, London, UK
  • 2015 Group Leader, the Francis Crick Institute, London, UK

Moritz was born in the rainy city of Hamburg in northern Germany and almost ended up as a lawyer. He prepared two applications - one for law and one for biology - and inserted one blind-folded into the post-box. Law was left in his hands and he is still thankful for that lucky choice today.

Throughout his academic career he has been interested in parasites and he has tried to attract as many as possible during his travels to Central America and South-East Asia. However, it was not until he met his future PhD advisor Tim Gilberger during a semester in Melbourne, Australia, that he got hooked on malaria.

Moritz complete his PhD at the Bernhard-Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg, Germany, studying protein trafficking and invasion of red blood cells by the malaria parasite. After that he spun the globe looking for places where good weather and outstanding science would meet, eventually moving to John Boothroyd's lab in Stanford, California, to learn about another interesting parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. During that time he also got closely engaged with the laboratory of Josh Elias where he learned as much about quantitative mass-spectrometry as possible.

He returned to the Europe in 2014, establishing his own lab at the MRC National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR). In April 2015 the NIMR officially became part of the Francis Crick Institute, joining forces with the London Research Institute, Clare Hall Laboratories and three London University Partners (UCL, Kings College, Imperial College). The Crick is a fantastic place to do science in a collaborative and enjoyable way. The vicinity of several major research institutes and large universities produce a vibrant scientific community to work in.