Cell unable to complete the recombinational repair process show abnormalities at cell division.

Introduction

The focus of our research is to determine the cellular mechanisms for DNA repair and to define the cellular defects that lead to cancers and neurodegeneration, two common consequences of defective damage processing.

Our genetic material (DNA) is continually subjected to damage, either from endogenous sources such as reactive oxygen species that arise as by-products of oxidative metabolism, from the breakdown of replication forks during cell growth, or by agents in the environment such as ionising radiation or carcinogenic chemicals.

To cope with such damage, cells employ a variety of repair processes that are specialised to recognise different types of lesions in DNA. These repair systems are essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and for cancer avoidance.

The focus of our research is to determine the cellular mechanisms for DNA repair and to define the cellular defects that lead to cancers and neurodegeneration, two common consequences of defective damage processing.